Fixing Rest in D&D 5E

Tired of dealing with rest in D&D? (See what I did there?) Then read on…

ChronoTriggerRest.jpg

In 5th Edition D&D, players decide how many hit dice they wish to expend after a “Short Rest” (one hour of downtime). A character could take a Short Rest and spend, for example, 1 hit die, and then take another Short Rest and spend 4 hit dice. This makes resting a matter of strategically managing resources, which some players may enjoy. However, as The Angry GM points out in “Hitting the Rest Button,” this makes absolutely no sense if you think of the player’s choices as representing the character’s. In order to obtain the benefit of rolling more hit dice, characters don’t actually have to rest longer, eat more food, or tend to their injuries more closely. The player arbitrarily decides how much their character will heal after each rest, which is deducted from their daily allowance, as if the character could somehow control how quickly their own wounds heal through sheer willpower.

You may argue that the mechanic represents the varied rate at which wounds heal and puts the variation in the control of the player rather than leaving it up to random chance. Even though the player is in control, it doesn’t necessarily mean the character is controlling anything. But, like The Angry GM, I prefer my games to be more immersive than that. By asking the players how much their characters heal, you shatter the illusion that they are their characters. What’s more, I find that the resting mechanic as presented in 5E tends to slow the game down, with little payback. When players are asked to manage their hit dice, more often than not it feels like a chore instead of a strategic deliberation. Especially to people just getting started with D&D (as many of my players are), it’s just one more thing to keep track of on an already crowded character sheet.

That’s why I’ve opted for a fixed rest mechanic in my games. By “fixed,” I don’t mean that I’ve repaired a broken system (though I like to think so). I mean that the rate at which each character heals is set—it’s not up to the players to decide.

My solution is a little different from the ideas The Angry GM came up with:

After a Short Rest, the player rolls half of their hit dice (rounded up) and adds their Constitution modifier to each roll. For example, a Level 8 Fighter with 14 Con rolls 1d10+2 four times. These hit dice are not “spent”—the character may take multiple Short Rests per day, rolling 4 HD each time, but not without seeing some action between each resting period. Also, at a certain point (GM’s discretion, but usually after two Short Rests), the character must take a Long Rest before they can benefit from further Short Rests. In other words, a character heals roughly half of their HP after taking a Short Rest, which they can do around twice per day, but not twice in a row.

This system is roughly equivalent to the 5E resting system (assuming the PCs take about two Short Rests before settling down for a Long Rest), but it’s faster, easier, and more immersive.

After a Long Rest, a player is fully healed, as per standard 5E rules.

If you’re looking for a grittier system, cut the allotted hit dice in half (1/4 HD for a Short Rest and 1/2 HD for a Long Rest). Under those rules, our Level 8 Fighter would roll only 2 HD after a Short Rest and 4 HD after a Long Rest.

Short & Simple, Stupid

These days I’ve been getting back into Dungeon Mastering with a vengeance (that’s running Dungeons & Dragons adventures, for all you sad non-nerds out there). In addition to DMing for two different groups at the same time, I’ve been reading and watching a lot of helpful content put together by other awesome DMs (shout out to Drunkens & Dragons, The Angry GM, and Performance Check).

I started keeping notes to keep track of what I’ve learned, and I thought you, savvy reader, might want to learn along with me. Although I use 5th Edition D&D to run my games, these lessons should be useful for any brand of tabletop RPG.

Clockwork Dungeon.jpg

What you’re looking at up there is the aftermath of “The Clockwork Dungeon,” my latest adventure. I’ve gotta say, I’m darn proud of the rotating gear-based cipher puzzle I came up with for this one (you can see the decoder in the foreground), but if I ran this adventure again, I’d make one important change, which is the subject of today’s tip:

Keep it Short. Keep it Simple.

The Clockwork Dungeon was pretty short (about 4 hours), but it could’ve been even shorter and a whole lot simpler. The main map, as you can see from the photo, consisted of two large rotating rings connected by a dozen smaller rotating cogs. The scale of this place was daunting—it contained more than 20 rooms to explore (most of which held nothing of importance or interest to the players), and it was filled with over a hundred potential enemies. I say “potential” because most of them could be avoided as long as the players were cautious.

I expected the players to stealth their way toward the obviously important area in the center of the map, skipping past the stuff that was there just to provide context and atmosphere. The thing is, players (being paranoid perfectionists at heart) are inclined to explore every 5-ft square of your setting and over-plan every step of the way. Plus, even if they’re trying to avoid unnecessary encounters, there’s always the chance someone rolls a 1 on a stealth roll and all hell breaks loose.

Clearly, in retrospect, there was no reason to include all those rooms and enemies if most of them were supposed to be ignored. Several times throughout the session I had to nudge the players past the things that weren’t important so that we could get to the cool parts. So what was all that clutter doing there in the first place?

Quite simply, I got carried away. I imagined an immense clockwork complex tended by a swarm of automata. I designed the complex based on what its architects wanted it to be, rather than streamlining it to suit the needs of the adventure.

The truth is I could’ve condensed the whole shebang to maybe five rooms and a handful of enemies, and it still would’ve made sense in terms of the game setting. The players would’ve been significantly less distracted. Moreover, my prep time would’ve been cut at least in half, and the adventure would’ve been more balanced in terms of the campaign world. The players discovering that there’s an army of mechanical wonders nestled inside a nearby mountain has major repercussions for later adventures.

So here’s a summary of what I learned from this and other similar experiences:

  • Keep it Short. If your situation is anything like mine, your group can only afford 3-4 hours every other week. You want each of your players to feel like they had fun and accomplished something by the end of the night. Also, keep in mind that however long you think your adventure is going to take, it’s gonna go at least an hour longer than that. A good rule of thumb is to keep your plans down to about 5 scenes, encounters, or rooms.
  • Keep it Simple. What do you think is really cool about your adventure? Focus on making those aspects as cool as possible and throw out everything else. Avoid including content because you feel like it logically should be there, even though the players aren’t supposed to interact with it. I’m constantly surprised at how long players can get distracted by some random detail I included just to flesh out the environment.

I think keeping these two points in mind will save me a lot of prep time and help me deliver fun, fast-paced adventures from start to finish.

Freedom, Sweet Freedom!

After five long years, I’ve finally finished my MA degree!

TheMaster

And while I was chipping away at my thesis, I had to put many of my creative projects on hold. So now I’m eager to get back to my “workshop.”

If you’ve been here before, I’m sure you noticed that I’ve already given the place an overhaul. For one, it’s a workshop now. Fancy that! Expect more additions soon…

Short Story to be Published in Cricket Magazine

Hello, Internet! It’s been a while!

First of all, I’d like to announce that a short story of mine will be published in the upcoming November/December issue of Cricket Magazine! Based on an Ainu folktale, the story is called “Resak and the Bear.” Cricket has always been one of my favorite literary magazines, and it is an honor to have my story included in this issue.

In other news, you may have noticed that I’ve changed this website a bit. The Editing section has been removed and replaced with a new section — Games. It’s a little empty at the moment, but expect it to be filling up fairly soon. Over the last year, I’ve started to take my lifelong gaming hobby more and more seriously. I’m very excited about the projects I’ve been working on lately, and I hope to have something to share with you all soon!

What with starting a new job as an English teacher (not to mention my ongoing graduate studies, my first novel, and now the upcoming games), I can no longer offer my services as a freelance editor or illustrator (which is why the Editing section of the site is no more, and also why you will no longer see pricing rates under Visual Art).

Speaking of Visual Art, I updated the gallery with some concept art I produced for an indie computer game called Shadows of Niflheim by Glacier Studios. The game is yet to be released and seems a tad ambitious for the small indie company, but their talented staff has created a rich, colorful world and produced many innovative ideas. I had a lot of fun contributing to the game’s development and I wish them all the best. Keep an eye out for it — when it comes time for them to launch, I’m sure they could use your support!

Well, I think that’s all for now. Thanks for dropping by!

Hello, World(wide Web)!

Welcome, friends!

This is a space to keep the books, short stories, art, and other things I’ve made so I can share them with you.

Where are the books? Well… actually, I lied. There aren’t any yet. But I’m working on it! For now you’ll just have to content yourselves with the stories and the pretty pictures.

By the way, for those of you who know me as Jude Coulter-Pultz—no, I haven’t changed my name. And, no, I’m not on the run from a dark and terrible past involving the yakuza and a freighter full of purloined penguins. That of course would be ridiculous. I’ve simply decided to try out this new pen name in order to make things a little easier for everyone.

So thanks for stopping by! Hope to see you again soon!

Oh, and if anyone asks about the penguins, tell them I had nothing to do with it. There are no penguins here.